Leadership Assessment

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The Mental Muscle Diagram Indicator (MMDI)
The MMDI suggests that leaders show approach these two questions together. The first is "What qualities do I need to be a leader in this context?" and "Which contexts require the leadership qualities that I offer?". Answering them together will better help leaders be able to use both answers most effectively.
Transformational Leadership

Leadership Assessment

I fall into three categories of the MMDI Leadership Assessment equally at 19%. The first is the ideological leader, second, is the participative leader, and finally; the change-oriented leader. The way in which these three types of leadership fall into the diagram is indicative of extraversion. I am involved in taking action and interacting directly with people and things.

The Ideological Leader
The ideological leader achieves through the promotion of certain ideals and values and keeps them the focus for the group because they are most important. I am founded in a strong belief system that is shared by the groups I lead and I focus on supporting those beliefs and convictions as an important part of the group. I am led by a deep passion for the cause, product or service.
The Participative Leader
The participative leader achieves through people, through team work, and through collective involvement in the task. I involve engendering ownership amongst the follower group to that they feel jointly responsible for the direction taken and its achievement. I make people feel valued as an integral part of the team, and make the group itself become the focus for the team so that they achieve through their relationships and cooperative teamwork.
The Change-Oriented Leader
The change-oriented leader tries to promote exploration of new and better ways of doing things or tries to uncover hidden potential in people, things, and situations. Change-oriented leaders like me work towards a better future, but I tend to not know at the outset what the future is. I introduce change based on an expectation that things can be improved, and then learn from experimentation, where exactly that potential lies. This means that some of my initiatives succeed, but others fail, which does not discourage me at all.
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